Waste Management Business Models in South Africa

Waste Management Business Models in South Africa

Johannesburg, Cape Town, and Tshwane Provide a Roadmap for Future Waste Management

RELEASE DATE
05-Apr-2016
REGION
Africa
Research Code: 9AAE-00-1F-00-00
SKU: EN00838-AF-MR_17025
$1,500.00
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EN00838-AF-MR_17025
$1,500.00
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Description

Due to the recent changes reflected in the National Environmental Management: Waste Act 59 of 2008, the waste sector in South Africa is not yet formalised. These changes encourage the diversion of waste to landfill by avoiding, reducing, re-using, recycling, and processing used materials. This significant change in focus has created opportunities for public and private participants. According to the 2012 Baseline Report, 59,353,910 tonnes of waste was generated in South Africa in 2011. Of this, 10% was diverted from landfills. This study attempts to identify and profile current and future key business models for waste management in the 3 major cities of Johannesburg, Cape Town, and Tshwane.

Table of Contents

Country Overview—South Africa

Tonnes of Waste Generated in South Africa

South African Waste Management Activities

Waste Definition in South Africa

Basic Composition of Waste in South Africa

Waste Management in Cape Town—Case Study

Waste Management in Johannesburg—Case Study

Waste Management in Tshwane—Case Study

Future Trends in Waste Management Business Models

Opportunities Defined

Key Questions This Study Will Answer

Country Overview—South Africa

South African Waste Management Activities

Total Estimated Financial Value of the Waste Sector in South Africa

Legislation and Policy Governing Waste in South Africa

Regulatory Framework Guiding Waste Management Activities in South Africa

Definition of Waste in South Africa

Waste Definition in South Africa

Availability of Recent Waste Data in South Africa

Tonnes of Waste Generated in South Africa

General Waste

Hazardous Waste

Hazardous Waste Handling Process

Basic Composition of Waste in South Africa

Unclassified Waste

Waste Generation per Province

South Africa’s Definition of Waste Management

Role of Private Participants in South Africa

Private Participants

Private Participants (continued)

Private Participants (continued)

Private Participants (continued)

Waste Sector Survey

Waste Services Rendered

Geographic Coverage

Types of Waste Handled

Global Factors Influencing Waste Management

Global Factors Influencing Waste Management (continued)

Local Factors Influencing Waste Management

Local Factors Influencing Waste Management (continued)

Recycling in South Africa

Recycling Process

Recycling Insights

The Ideal Process

City Case Studies

Cape Town

Role of CoCT Municipality

Activities Included in CoCT’s Current Solid Waste Management Functions

Waste Collection in Cape Town

Cape Town—Sources and Collection of Waste

Waste Management—Transfer Stations

Materials Recovery Facility

CoCT Materials Recovery Facilities

Waste by Rail in Cape Town

Composting Facilities

Waste Collection in Informal Settlements

Recycling in Cape Town

Cape Town’s Active General Waste (Glb) Landfill Sites

Cape Town’s 2 Active Hazardous Waste (H:h and H:H) Landfill Sites

CoCT Future Plans

Waste Management in Cape Town

Johannesburg

Role of the CoJ Municipality

Pikitup and the CoJ

Pikitup Service Offering

Types of Waste Managed by the City versus Private Participants

Pikitup—Sources and Collection of Waste

Johannesburg’s Active Landfill Sites

Snapshot of Some of Johannesburg’s Private Landfill Sites

Recycling in Johannesburg

Residential Recycling in Johannesburg

Pikitup Waste to Landfill Diversion

Waste Collection in Informal Settlements

Factors Influencing Recycling Project Implementation Analysis

Creating Awareness, Building Capacity, and Encouraging Public Participation

Gaps in the Waste Management Services Offered by the City

Gaps in the Waste Management Services Offered by the City (continued)

CoJ’s Future Plans

Waste Management in Johannesburg

Tshwane

Role of the CoT Municipality

Tshwane Municipality Service Offering

Types of Waste Managed by the City versus Private Participants

Tshwane Municipality—Sources and Collection of Waste

Tshwane Municipality—Garden Refuse Sites

Tshwane Municipality—Transfer Stations

Tshwane’s Active General Waste (Glb) Landfill Sites

Tshwane’s Active General Waste (Glb) Landfill Sites (continued)

Recycling in Tshwane

Waste Collection in Informal Settlements

Future Plans

Waste Management in Tshwane

Waste to Energy in South Africa

Noteworthy Initiatives Implemented by Big Businesses

Woolworths and Hotel Verde

South African Breweries (SAB)

A Possible Alternative Approach—The Proposition of a Circular Economy in South Africa

Informal Waste Picking as a Source of Income

Future Trends in Waste Management Business Models

Opportunities Defined

Legal Disclaimer

The Frost & Sullivan Story

Value Proposition—Future of Your Company & Career

Global Perspective

Industry Convergence

360º Research Perspective

Implementation Excellence

Our Blue Ocean Strategy

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Due to the recent changes reflected in the National Environmental Management: Waste Act 59 of 2008, the waste sector in South Africa is not yet formalised. These changes encourage the diversion of waste to landfill by avoiding, reducing, re-using, recycling, and processing used materials. This significant change in focus has created opportunities for public and private participants. According to the 2012 Baseline Report, 59,353,910 tonnes of waste was generated in South Africa in 2011. Of this, 10% was diverted from landfills. This study attempts to identify and profile current and future key business models for waste management in the 3 major cities of Johannesburg, Cape Town, and Tshwane.
More Information
No Index No
Podcast No
Author Muneera Salie
Industries Environment
WIP Number 9AAE-00-1F-00-00
Is Prebook No